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Peanut Sesame Brittle Recipe
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Peanut Sesame Brittle Recipe

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Peanut Sesame Brittle Recipe

What does Peanut Sesame Brittle Recipe mean to me? It means the temptation of holding the golden glistening candy bar in my hand, the unadulterated, childlike joy of biting into the crunchy candy, and the seductive call of caramel and toasted peanuts. Long story short, I find this simple candy irresistible!

Brittles are popular almost everywhere in the world. Other than peanuts, walnuts, pecans, almonds and sesame seeds are also embedded in the hard set pieces of sugar candy. It’s known as peanut chikki or gachak in the Indian subcontinent and instead of white sugar, brown sugar or jaggery is used to make the candy.

In China this candy is called Fah Sung Thong and is a popular treat for Chinese New Year as it represents sweetness and happiness for the coming year. Peanuts symbolise health, long life, prosperity, good fortune and stability in Chinese culture.

You can imagine what a joyous gift this brittle would make for any of your Asian friends.

We make this Peanut Sesame Brittle Recipe often in winter season as a light munching treat to go with the afternoon tea. There is really no set quantity of ingredients, you can choose any of your favourite nuts, less peanuts, more sesame seeds, toast them or not, add chilli and spice or not, etc. I add salt, red chilli flakes and fennel seeds because they cut through the plain sweetness of sugar and give a lovely flavour dimension to the candy.

If you haven’t tried this glorious gold bar bejewled with nuts, you are missing something seriously good!

Enjoy and don’t forget to give your feedback!

There are however a few MUST DOs and DONTs:

-do generously grease the surface or pan that you are using to set the brittle on, as well as the knife to cut.

-do add water to the sugar, it helps the sugar to dissolve quickly and more evenly.

-don’t stir the syrup.

-don’t ever touch the syrup with bare hands, it is very very hot!

-timing is very important while making the syrup and cooling the candy for cutting, do

stay alert.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons sesame seeds

1 cup peanuts, shelled and skins removed

1/2 teaspoon red chilli flakes

1 teaspoon Chinese five spice blend or crushed fennel seeds

1/4 teaspoon salt

1+1/2 cup granulated sugar

1 tablespoon lemon juice

3 tablespoons water

Vegetable oil to grease the pan and knife.


This Is a What You Do:

Generously grease a square tin pan (8×8) or line it with nonstick paper. Set aside. Also grease a big knife and keep ready to cut the brittle.

Lightly toast the sesame seeds and peanuts in a frying pan or skillet. Remove from heat. Add red chilli flakes, salt and five spice blend. Toss to mix.

Spread them evenly in the prepared pan.

In a saucepan add sugar, lemon juice and water. Cover the pan with a lid, cook the mixture on low heat for 5-6 minutes or till the sugar is completely dissolved and turns into a beautiful golden brown coloured syrup. Do not stir.

To check if the syrup is ready, drop a little syrup in cold water, it should set immediately.

Immediately pour the syrup over the sesame and peanuts mix, taking care that it should go into all nooks and crannies.

Let cool on room temperature for 4 minutes in the pan. Remove from pan.

Cut the brittle into bars, squares or triangles. Don’t wait to long to cut, if it hardens then it won’t cut but will simply break into shards.

Leave to harden completely for another 30 minutes. Then you can store them in an airtight jar.

Serves 8-10

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2 Comments

  • Ravishankar S. says:

    Liked the emphasis on the “don’t s” . Very crucial for safety.

    Lovely snack, comes in handy during outdoor activities like cycling & hiking.

    • Maria Nasir says:

      Thank you, Ravi! Blogging brings a responsibility of conveying information with complete honesty. I imagine my own daughters reading and cooking from the blog and try to foresee the difficulties and hazards they might encounter in the kitchen. I wouldn’t dream of them or any of my esteemed visitors coming to harm or getting disappointed cooking from this blog.

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